Floyd County, IN Investigating Possible Blood Borne Pathogen Scare At Wrestling Event

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Floyd County Health Department has made the following available:

FCHD IS INVESTIGATING AN EVENT THAT MAY HAVE EXPOSED PEOPLE TO BLOOD BORNE PATHOGENS

If you attended an event on Sunday, June 23, 2019 at 1445 South Street New Albany IN, called Welcome to the Wreckroom Pro Wrestling event and were exposed to blood or bodily fluids at the scene of the wrestling event, you are highly encouraged to contact the Floyd County Health Department at 1917 Bono Rd, New Albany, Indiana, 812-948-4726, to be tested for HIV and HEP C.

CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine health care. About 1 in 7 people in the United States who have HIV don’t know they have it.

People at higher risk should get tested more often. If you were HIV-negative the last time you were tested, and that test was more than one year ago, and you answer yes to any of the following questions, you should get an HIV test as soon as possible because these things increase your chances of getting the virus:

  • Are you a man who has had sex with another man?
  • Have you had sex—anal or vaginal—with an HIV-positive partner?
  • Have you had more than one sex partner since your last HIV test?
  • Have you injected drugs and shared needles or works (for example, water or cotton) with others?
  • Have you exchanged sex for drugs or money?
  • Have you been diagnosed with or sought treatment for another sexually transmitted disease?
  • Have you been diagnosed with or treated for hepatitis or tuberculosis (TB)?
  • Have you had sex with someone who could answer yes to any of the above questions or someone whose sexual history you don’t know?

You should be tested at least once a year if you keep doing any of these things. Sexually active gay and bisexual men may benefit from more frequent testing (for example, every 3 to 6 months).

If you’re pregnant, talk to your health care provider about getting tested for HIV and other ways to protect you and your child from getting HIV.

Before having sex for the first time with a new partner, you and your partner should talk about your sexual and drug-use history, disclose your HIV status, and consider getting tested for HIV and learning the results.

Persons for Whom HCV Testing Is Recommended

  • Adults born from 1945 through 1965 should be tested once (without prior ascertainment of HCV risk factors)

  • HCV testing is recommended for those who:

    • Currently injecting drugs
    • Ever injected drugs, including those who injected once or a few times many years ago
    • Have certain medical conditions, including persons:
      • who received clotting factor concentrates produced before 1987
      • who were ever on long-term hemodialysis
      • with persistently abnormal alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT)
      • who have HIV infection
    • Were prior recipients of transfusions or organ transplants, including persons who:
      • were notified that they received blood from a donor who later tested positive for HCV infection
      • received a transfusion of blood, blood components, or an organ transplant before July 1992
  • HCV- testing based on a recognized exposure is recommended for:

    • Healthcare, emergency medical, and public safety workers after needle sticks, sharps, or mucosal exposures to HCV-positive blood

    • Children born to HCV-positive women

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