Former WWF Star Calls Fabulous Moolah a “Monstrous Person” & “Real-Life Heel”

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As previously reported, WWE has been receiving heavy backlash over naming a WrestleMania 34 women’s battle royal after the late Fabulous Moolah. While the company has always celebrated the Hall of Famer as a decorated women’s champion and wrestling pioneer, her history of shady business practices and even alleged criminal activity has been public knowledge for decades.

Ryan Satin of Pro Wrestling Sheet got the chance to speak with former WWF wrestler Jeannine Mjoseth (aka Mad Maxine), who did not have anything positive to say about her one-time trainer.

“The Fabulous Moolah was a real-life heel. A lot of women paid to train at her school and then went out on the road. They risked life and limb in their matches and she repaid them with the worst kinds of abuses. She skimmed their money, she ignored women who were badly hurt, she pimped women out to creepy men and on and on.”

Mjoseth continued on, claiming that she actually relocated to Championship Wrestling from Florida, along with Luna Vachon and others, just to “get the hell away” from the WWE Hall of Famer.

“I’d much rather see WWE establish a named match for outstanding wrestlers (and decent human beings) like Susan ‘Tex’ Green, Beverly Shade, Leilani Kai, Wendi Richter, Princess Victoria or Joyce Grable. They all put their hearts and souls into wrestling for decades and helped others along the way.”

Stories of Moolah’s horrific training practices date all the way back to the 1950s. She would allegedly charge women exorbitant sums of money just to be accepted into her wrestling school, and anyone who signed handed over rights to their own bookings and were forced to give up large portions of their income (up to 30% in some cases). And that’s to say nothing of the numerous unconfirmed reports that she would “pimp” out her students and other women in the industry, often to promoters who refused to pay up until they received certain “services” from the female performers.

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